Six Months In and I Feel Like I Belong

I’ve been in post for six months now and I can finally say with confidence that I feel as though I have “settled in”. How do I know that I’ve settled in? Re-reading my last blog after three months it’s pretty clear that I wasn’t sure then, and in retrospect even more clear that I … Continue reading Six Months In and I Feel Like I Belong

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From Problem to Solution

Yes I was battered and bruised, and no I wasn't capable of fulfilling all the duties of a consultant but despite this I still had a role to play, a way I could contribute to the specialty that I loved, a reason to belong in EM. For the first time in nearly two years I wasn't just a problem, I was a solution.

Conjugating Irregular Verbs

These are examples of a bias called Emotive Conjugation, which is the tendency for us to judge our own traits, attitudes and actions more charitably than those of others. We play down our own failings and foibles, coming up with excuses and explanations for them, whilst treating those of others more harshly and as personal flaws in their character.

Questioning Your Diagnosis

The frailties of our cognition are long established and whilst it may not be possible, or even desirable, to have all clinicians thinking alike, we must acknowledge these faults inherent in human thinking and make deliberate efforts to mitigate them. What follows are six simple questions that attempt to trigger a more reflective process by diagnosticians and potentially reduce the impact of erroneous thinking.

Supercharge Your Learning

This is a very briefly summary of evidence based learning strategies and then my suggestion of how we can apply them to our busy, everyday clinical practice. This is not meant as a substitute for quality time spent with an experienced educator but it is something we can do for ourselves to help compliment and consolidate any formal learning that we receive.